Random. A poem.

Inestimable
And contrary
The random thoughts
And musings
Of one
On the other side
Of the veil
Cocksure and homespun
And all designed
To take
Your breath away
In a
Single
Random
Heartbeat

poetry books - stevestillstanding

For more of my poetry, check out Poetry for the Sad, Lonely and Hopelessly Endangered and The All or the Nothing, available in print or e-book formats.

Click here to find out how to get your copy.

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Godzilla 2: King of the Monsters. A movie review.

No spoilers!

If you like oversized beasties ripping buildings apart you’re gonna love this pic. Even the family drama at the centre of the movie was good.

I enjoyed the first Godzilla a few years back, and then Skull Island, the Kong movie set in the same cinematic universe. This sequel works as well as the others, setting up Godzilla as the dude Kong will fight in the next movie. Monarch, the semi-secret monster-hunting organisation is back, this time with husband and wife scientists (Vera Farmiga and Kyle Chandler) and their daughter (Millie Bobbie Brown) working with them. There’s a new eco-terrorist (Charles Dance) determined to set the various ubermonsters free and return the planet to a more natural state, but one of the Titans turns out to be more than Monarch can handle.

One problem—Monarch, an almost faceless organisation, is the human link between all the movies, but none of the recognisable characters stay for long, so there’s no one for viewers to emotionally connect with over time (something the Marvel movies do so well). The character development and acting in Godzilla 2 is great, but it doesn’t seem to be enough to just have a big monster as the thing that brings audiences back each time. I’m hoping some of the faces in this movie will be back for Godzilla vs Kong, because we need some likeable ongoing human characters to root for.

Godzilla 2 was enjoyable and well worth a watch. The special effects were amazing! I’m just hoping the connective tissue between these movies becomes a little more recognisable.

Rating: B

For more Movie Buff ‘n Stuff, click here.

Guessed. A poem.

My guest, I guessed I knew you;
I was wrong, as I often am,
But fail to admit to.

My guest, you came and went away,
And left me wanting more,
As I have and will, for days.

My guest, I tasted the soul of you,
Guessed at the flavour, and,
Surprised, forgot the golden rule:

To love is, eventually, to lose,
No matter the guest
You guessed you’d choose.

poetry books - stevestillstanding

For more of my poetry, check out Poetry for the Sad, Lonely and Hopelessly Endangered and The All or the Nothing, available in print or e-book formats.

Click here to find out how to get your copy.

Eternal Vacancy. A sonnet.

You are as far from my thoughts as you aren’t
Sequestered and dream-like, merely a ghost
Wandering hallways that lie black and burnt
My mind harks to you, once or twice at most
Another fills this shady vacancy
Whispering lonely hellos and goodbyes
From the shadows that long imprison me
Manufacturing bindings for the blind
She dances, in 3/4 time upon the floor
Her message, all rhythm and subtextual
Her presence awakens the flame amore
And like the jester, I play the fool

Like all of my misguided gestures
Lost eternal as her spirit sings

poetry books - stevestillstanding

For more of my poetry, check out Poetry for the Sad, Lonely and Hopelessly Endangered and The All or the Nothing, available in print or e-book formats.

Click here to find out how to get your copy.

Driven. A poem.

The prairie and the road calls,
A waltz of remembrance
Dancing along the asphalt,
Like a tumbleweed made of last regrets.

The stick shift clicks in place,
The tension defining its existence
mirrored on the driver’s face.

Wheels spin and smoke
And the car strides forth
Like the lion on the newborn veldt,
Hunting for the prey that will stoke
Each and every kindled fire.

Every junction calls his name,
A whisper passing by
Like a ghost of Christmas past,
A brief entanglement in a roadside motel
That’s far too short and soon forgotten.

The freeway calls to him,
The art majestic and the weary eye,
Casting all doubts aside.
The way of all things revealed,
Found and lost and soon to be received.

poetry books - stevestillstanding

For more of my poetry, check out Poetry for the Sad, Lonely and Hopelessly Endangered and The All or the Nothing, available in print or e-book formats.

Click here to find out how to get your copy.

Pokémon: Detective Pikachu. A movie review.

No spoilers!

I hate Pokémon. But my son dragged me to see this because of his lifelong obsession with the cute and annoying cartoon creatures, and I have to say…it wasn’t that bad.

Pokémon-less Tim (Justice Smith) finds out his estranged dad has died in a car accident and travels to Ryme City, where Pokémon live in harmony with humans. Most humans bond with a Pokémon, but not Tim. He meets Detective Pikachu (Ryan Reynolds) in his father’s apartment and after breathing a strange gas, realises he can understand what Pikachu says. Pikachu believes Tim’s father is still alive, so they team up.

What can I say about this movie? It’s definitely for kids or lifelong fans. The Pokémon are nicely realised in 3D animation next to their live action counterparts. They’re not as annoying as the cartoons where trainers throw pokeballs at each other and the doofus creatures fight (although there is a scene like that to keep longterm fans happy). There are a few amusing jokes along the way (it seems Reynolds is destined to do his Deadpool-shtick for the rest of his acting career – this version is a lot tamer, of course). The CGI is good, the creatures are cute and cuddly, there’s some cliches and a few nice twists in the story.

Whilst I’m not a fan, I didn’t mind sitting through Pokémon: Detective Pikachu. My son lapped it up. And he’s not exactly a kid anymore.

Rating: C (my son and other big kids who don’t want to grow up: B)

For more movie reviews, click

here.

John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum. A movie review.

No spoilers!

I’m a big fan of the John Wick movies. JW3 is another fine entry in the violent action series.

Keanu Reeves is back as John Wick, the almost-retired hit man who loves his dead wife and wreaks bloody vengeance on, well, pretty much everyone over the death of the dog she left him. JW3 starts where JW2 left off: the High Table of assassins has excommunicated him and he needs to get out of New York fast in order to survive. This leads to lots of murder and mayhem, with Wick disposing of various assassins in new and gruesome ways. JW3 is all about loyalty and the consequences of Wick’s actions in previous films. There’s even a sly Matrix joke.

johnwick3

There’s a bit more world building about the High Table, some new characters, some new twists and a set up for the next movie (how unexpected), but don’t expect searing dialogue and multi-textured layers of meaning. That’s not what these films are about.

The JW franchise has prided itself on its use of practical effects and wonderfully visceral fight sequences. There are several action set pieces in JW3 and Keanu continues to perform many of the fight scenes himself. But age is catching up with him and in JW3 there’s more use of stunt doubles and CGI than previously. There’s nothing wrong with that, of course, it’s just an observation. There seems to be more guys getting punched and kicked in the balls than ever before, but maybe I just noticed it more this time around (there’s lots of crossed-leg moments in this film, especially when the dogs come out—for guys, anyway).

JW3 is great. Wick punches, kicks, throws and shoots his way out of trouble. And back into it. I’ll be back for the next one.

Rating: B+

For more movie reviews, click here.

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